Boston and the early Revolution

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We’ve started into Massachusetts.  I thought for a state with so much history and that was such a center for the start of the American Revolution it’d be great to start off with some history.

 

We talked through some of the events that happened there and why they were so upset, and while we talked about it they put together this map (from Time Travelers American Revolution).  It helped the kids get a bit of an idea what was happening and where.

 

 

We ran out of time that first week, so we continued the next week.  I talked about the Boston Massacre and how Paul Revere made a  Boston Massacre wood engraving that enraged many people.  I talked about how in some ways it was propaganda because he changed some of the details to make it look more one-sided than it really was (see link below). 

Description of details and finer points about Paul Revere’s engraving.

 

Afterwards they each got to make their own “wood carving”

 

Supplies: foam from a take out container or a clean meat tray  (HEB was kind enough to give me 6 clean unused trays to cut up); a bamboo skewer or toothpick (something sharp, you could use a pencil), tempera paint, paintbrush (preferably foam)

 

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Draw your design into the foam.  It takes a bit of work to find just the right way.  My kids mainly poked holes to make a pattern, but the older kids mastered actually drawing with it.

When you’re satisfied with your design paint a THIN layer of paint over it.  Emphasis on thin.

 

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So, they got to make an attempt at woodcarving and discovered it’s harder than it looks.

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While the paint dried we read “Paul Revere’s Ride,” a poem that I love for it’s cadence.  I remember at one point seeing a copy with the illustrations done in the style of woodcarving (it may have been woodcarvings), but I couldn’t find that one.

 

And just for fun here’s some fun videos I found on You Tube.  After seeing the first one my kids want me to make a Lego movie of their stories……..

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6 thoughts on “Boston and the early Revolution

  1. I like how you combined the study of MASS. and US history. The engravings are cool. My guys learned that engraving and printing is harder than it looks through our engraving activities, too.

  2. I hope you never take down your posts, as I just love everything you do with the kids. I know I will want to refer back when we begin to look more at history.

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